Derbyshire War Memorials
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Memorial Title

Shirebrook - Cross

Summary

Derbyshire War Memorials: A description of a WW1 and WW2 war memorial cross outside Holy Trinity Church at Shirebrook, Derbyshire.
Images

Setting memorial Inscription
Locations

Last known location:
Holy Trinity Churchyard
Church Dr
Shirebrook
Derbyshire
Nearest postcode:
NG20 8DE

NGR:
SK 52451 67518 ±5m
Location details:
The church is on the east side of the road. The cross is now west of the church between it and the road.
Type

Overall type: Cross.


Overall condition: Fair. The inscription is legible.


Description:

Originally a Cornish granite monument comprising a crucifix on a canopied cross surmounting a pillar, pedestal, plinth and base located on the roadside verge southwest of the church, outside the wall surrounding the churchyard and surrounded by a wooden pale fence.

At a later date the monument was moved about 18m further north to its present position where it is located within a small garden bounded by a low wall.

The white marble crucifix is attached to the 6 o'clock face of the cross which has a gabled canopy and surmounts a small collar on a tall slender tapered octagonal pillar. The square pedestal has vertical sides with hemispheres at each corner leading to a flat octagonal top with chamfered edges and the square plinth has a bevelled top. The square two-stepped base is surrounded by a narrow garden containing bedding plants, and by a low wall with built-in bollards which has the remains of chain or railing, now lost. The inscription is inlaid on the 6 o'clock face of the pillar and pedestal in upright capital block lettering.
Components:

Component Material Height Width Depth Condition
Crucifix White marble c600 c300 c75 Fair
Canopied cross Cornish granite c1000 c800 c200 Fair
Pillar Cornish granite c2700 c300 c300 Fair
Pedestal Cornish granite 400 700 700 Fair
Plinth Cornish granite 130 965 965 Fair
Base Cornish granite, sandstone 200 1980 1980 Fair
Fence Wood - - - Lost
Chain or railing Metal - - - Lost
Dimensions in millimetres ±5mm unless stated otherwise.
Inscription

1914-1918
1939-1945
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE
OF SHIREBROOK MEN
WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WARS
IN THE CAUSE OF JUSTICE & FREEDOM.
"GRANT THEM O LORD ETERNAL REST AND LET
LIGHT PERPETUAL SHINE UPON THEM."
Conflicts and people named:
Conflict First World War (1914-1919) Second World War (1939-1945)
Number died 0 0
Number served and returned 0 0
Total names 0 0
Administration

Custodian: Not known

Local authorities:
From WW1: Shirebrook Parish Council; Blackwell Rural District Council; Derbyshire County Council.
From 1974: Shirebrook Town Council; Bolsover District Council; Derbyshire County Council.
History

c1918: The memorial was initiated by five schoolgirls, (unknown) Braddon, Winnie Priestley, Dorothy (unknown), Madge Sales and Mabel Brewster. Their idea was supported by the community to the extent that the girls were encouraged to form a committee to acquire the memorial, chaired by the Vicar, Rev E Braddon.

1919: The memorial was created by Maile and Sons, sculpors from London, at a cost of £250 raised by public subscription.

2nd August, 1919: The memorial was unveiled and dedicated by the Bishop of Southwell and Nottingham, Rt Rev Edwyn Hoskyns.

1919-1938: The cross was moved c18m north of its original position, presumably to facilitate the construction of the church hall.

Unknown date: The mis-spelling Shirebrooke was corrected to Shirebrook.

Unknown date, possibly during WW2: Metal chains or railings around the memorial were removed.

1940s: The lettering was modified to extend the reference to WW2.

27th January 2016: The memorial was surveyed by Roy Branson and Alan Willmot. It was in fair condition although the stonework had acquired a thin encrustation of lichen.
References

Derbyshire Courier, 9th August 1919 p1 col1: A report of the unveiling.

The Picture the Past website has a monochrome photograph attributed to 1910-1920s (but obviously after 1919) with the cross in its original position.

The Picture the Past website has a coloured photograph attributed to the 1920s with the cross in its original position, which is clearly on the roadside verge outside the wall surrounding the churchyard.
Comments

Page © Roy Branson