Derbyshire War Memorials
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Memorial Title

Jacobite Army

Summary
Derbyshire War Memorials: a description of a Jacobite war memorial cairn in the Crewe and Harpur garden at Swarkestone.
Images
Setting Memorial Plaque Click on a thumbnail to see a larger image.
Further images may be available on request.
Locations
Last known location:
Beer garden
Crewe and Harpur Arms
Derby Rd (A514)
Swarkestone
Derbyshire
Nearest postcode:
DE73 7JB

NGR:
SK 36857 28553 ±5m OR
(From online digital mapping.)
(Map opens in new window.)
Location details:
The garden is at the junction of Derby Rd and Woodshop La. The memorial is near the bank of the River Trent.
Type
Overall type: Cairn.


Overall condition: Fair. The inscription is legible and the memorial is cared for.

Description:

A sandstone cairn formed from random sandstone blocks jointed with concrete and with a concrete cap. An oblong bronze plaque is attached to the face and has a narrow raised border and an inscription in raised upright lettering.

Glossary
Components:

Component Material Height Width Depth Condition
Cairn Sandstone, concrete 1550 1200 dia Fair
Plaque Bronze 320 450 15 Fair
Dimensions in millimetres ±5mm unless stated otherwise.
Inscription
THIS CAIRN MARKS THE
FARTHEST POINT SOUTH REACHED
BY THE JACOBITE ARMY OF
PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD STUART
ON 4TH DECEMBER 1745
Erected by the
Charles Edward Stuart Society
& Marstons Brewery
on the 250th anniversary
Conflicts and people named:
Conflict Jacobite Rising (1745-1746) Totals
Action
Number died 0 0
Number served and returned 0 0
Total names 0 0
Administration
Custodian: Presumed to be the Charles Edward Stuart Society and Marstons Brewery.

Local authorities:
From 1974: Swarkestone Parish Council; South Derbyshire District Council; Derbyshire County Council.
History
1995: The memorial was erected by the Charles Edward Stuart Society and Marstons Brewery.

15th February 2017: The memorial was surveyed by Roy Branson and Alan Willmot. It was in fair condition and cared for.
References
Comments
Following the occupation of Derby by the Jacobite army on 4th December 1745, Prince Charles proposed to march south towards London. To do so he would need to cross the River Trent on the Swarkestone Causeway (the modern bridge near the memorial was not constructed at the time and the river would have meandered over the floodplain). He sent scouts to review the crossing but subsequently agreed to turn back and return to Scotland. Thus the northern bank of the river was the most southerly point reached.

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Page © Roy Branson